QUIZ QUESTIONS

India Quiz Questions and Answers


1) What is the number of states in India?
d) 29
2) Which is the first state to be formed on the basis of language?
a)Andhra Pradesh
3) When was Burma was separated from India?
c)1937
4) When did India become a republic?
c)1950
5) Which state was divided into Maharashtra and Gujarat in 1960?
a)Bombay
6) Who was the Speaker of the Lok Sabha before he became the President of India?
c)N. Sanjeeva Reddy
7) What was the age of Morarji Desai when he became the Prime Minister?
c)81
8) How was Tamil Nadu known?
b)Madras


9) Which is the capital of Kerala?
d)Thiruvananthapuram
10) Nagaland was separated from which state?
d)Assam
11) Which is the smallest state in terms of area?
c)Goa
12) Where is the tomb of Akbar?
b)Sikandra
13) Which is the national animal of India?
d)Tiger
14) Which is the national flower of India?
a)Lotus
15) Who founded Indian National Congress?
b)A. O. Hume
16) Which former Indian Prime Minister’s birthday is on December 25?
b)Atal Bihari Vajpayee
17) Which state was known as North East Frontier Agency?
d)Arunachal Pradesh
18) Which state or union territory has French as an official language?
c)Pondicherry
19) Which is the official language of Jammu and Kashmir?
d)Urdu
20) Which state became part of India in 1975?
d)Sikkim
21) Which city was the summer capital of India during British Rule?
b)Simla
22) Who was the only Indian Governor General?
c)C. Rajagopalachari
23) Which Prime Minister could not prove his majority in Lok Sabha in May 1996?
c)Atal Behari Vajpayee
24) Which of the following religions did not originate in India?
d)Judaism
25) When did Rabindranath Tagore die?
b)1941

Portal:India/India Quiz/1


QUESTION 1
: She was a national swimming champion, a jockey, a Miss India, anactress, and now,Quiz Questions

a social activist. Who is being talking about?
ANSWER 1: Nafisa Ali

QUESTION 2: Which Indian was considered the "father of surgery?"
ANSWER 2: Sushruta

QUESTION 3: During the British rule of India there were a number of princely families. The
grandson of one of these Princes is now a popular Bollywood actor. Name the Prince in question
(the actor's grandfather).


QUESTION 4: Which India city got its name because of the presence of a large number of banyan
trees in that area?
[hide]
ANSWER 4: Vadodara

QUESTION 5: This person paid the highest individual income tax in the mid-1990s — apart from
also featuring in advertisements that exhorted people to pay income taxes. Who?
ANSWER 5: Mithun Chakraborty

QUESTION 6: Which character, according to the Hindu mythology is said to have offered
herself/himself as food to a lion in order to prevent it from attacking a cow?
ANSWER 6: Dileepa, ancestor of Rama, as recounted in Kalidasa's Raghuvamsa.

QUESTION 7: Which district can claim to have produced the maximum number of Bharat Ratnas,
how many of them and who are they?
ANSWER 7: Ratnagiri District, with the following awardees :
·         Dhondo Keshav Karve
·         Pandurang Vaman Kane
·         B. R. Ambedkar

QUESTION 8: Which Indian politician was acting PM twice but never became the a Prime Minister?[
ANSWER 8: Gulzarilal Nanda

QUESTION 9: How many Indians have won the Junior Singles' Event at Wimbledon? Name them.[hide]
ANSWER 9: Three Indians: Ramanathan Krishnan in 1954, his son Ramesh Krishnan in 1979, and Leander Paes in 1990

QUESTION 10: What connects M. S. Swaminathan, Verghese Kurien and Raja Ramanna,
the men behind the green, white and nuclear revolutions of India?

QUESTION 11: A famous Indian personality was misplaced accidentally by the hospital staff when
he was born. This was found by his uncle because he had noticed a deformity in the baby on the first day.
Name this famous person whose life would have been different but for his uncle.
ANSWER 11: Sunil Gavaskar

QUESTION 12: Name the Indian athlete who lost a medal in an Olympic event by 100th of a second?[hide]
ANSWER 12: Pilavullakandi Thekkeparambil Usha (P.T. Usha), in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

QUESTION 13: Who was the first Non-Congress Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, and what party
did he represent?
[hide]

QUESTION 14: When was the practice of pre-censoring movies introduced in India and by which
act?
ANSWER 14: In 1918, with the cinematograph act.

QUESTION 15: He is supposed to be a prophet who migrated to Kashmir around 2000 years ago
and is believed to be the fifth advent of Buddha in some accounts. Who is being talking about?
ANSWER 15: Yuz Asaf

QUESTION 16: Which university is regarded (at least by some) to be the oldest in the world?[hide]
ANSWER 16: Takshashila

QUESTION 17: When the Babri Mosque was demolished in 1992, the Government of India asked the
Rajputana Rifles to go to Ayodhya and control the situation there. For the first time in history, a regiment refused to follow the government order citing a very strange but valid reason. What was the reason given by Rajputana Rifles for not obeying government's order?
ANSWER 17: Their battle cry was "Raja Ram Chandra ki Jai", that is, "Victory to Lord Rama. Their presence could have been perceived as favouring a community.

QUESTION 18: Who can be regarded as India's first rap singer and what is the song?[hide]
ANSWER 18: Ashok Kumar's Railgadi

QUESTION 19: Who is the most famous child of Prakash and Prem Peshawaria?
ANSWER 19: Kiran Bedi

QUESTION 20: P.T.Usha is probably most famous for losing out an Olympic track and field
Gold medal by a whisker in 1984. Lesser known is the fact that two other athletes from Kerala had also competed in the finals of a track and field event in the same Olympics. Who all?
[hide]
ANSWER 20: 4X400m women's relay - M. D. Valsamma and Shiny Abraham (now Wilson) were the two other athletes from Kerala in the team. Vandana Rao, a non-Keralite completes the quartet.

QUESTION 21: Which film comedian is widely regarded as the first film comedian to receive the
Padma Shri from the Government of India? Also mention the year.

QUESTION 22: Link the following.
·         Lenovo
·         Airtel
·         Cole Porter
·         and the words Cash Mountain
[
ANSWER 22: The link is Kaun Banega Crorepati. Lenovo is the sponsor for the famous "Computerji" on the Indian version. Airtel is also a sponsor for KBC2. Cole porter wrote a song with that title. A proposal that became the TV show with that title was originally called Cash Mountain

QUESTION 23: Although mute, this resident of Kolkata received visitors from across India, and
around the world. At the time of his death within the last five years he was one of the oldest residents of Kolkata. What was his name?
ANSWER 23: Adwaita: An Aldabra Seychelles tortoise of Kolkotta (255 yrs old).

QUESTION 24: Connect Anthony Gonsalvez, Anand Babu, and Subbiah Rajarathinam.
ANSWER 24: Amar Kabaddi. Anthony Gonsalves was a character in Amar Akbar Anthony, Anand Babu in Amar Prem. Subbiah Rajarathinam plays Kabbadi, which has the three forms Surjeevani, Gaminee and Amar.

QUESTION 25: At what location is it said that Lord Vishnu made an offering to Lord Siva of an eye?
ANSWER 25: Kashi


1. The following countries have a border with India to the North West:

a.    Afganistan
b.    Pakistan
c.    China 
d.    Bhutan

2. Which state in India has the highest literacy rate:
a.    Tamil Nadu
b.    Kerala
c.    Mizoram
d.    Lakshadweep

3. What is the ratio of the width of the Indian Flag to the its Length:
a.    1:1
b.    2:3
c.    4:2
d.    2:4


4. The song Jana-gana-Mana was originally composed in:

a.    Bengali
b.    Hindi
c.    Urdu
d.    Sanskrit

5. The song Vande Mantaram was composed by:

a.    Rabindranath Tagore
b.    Bankimchandra Chatterjic.    

6. The National Animal of India is the :
a.    Tiger
b.    Lion
c.    Peacock
d.    Leopard

7. The National Tree of India is the:
a.    Neem Tree
b.    Lotus Tree
c.    Banyan Tree
d.    Mango Tree

8. The National Fruit of India is the 

a.    Mango
b.    Lotus Fruit
c.    Gauva
d.    Papaya

9. The constitution of India was adopted on :
a.    1947
b.    1948
c.    1949
d.    1950

10. The following is a true statement in 2011:
a.    India comprises of  28 states and 6 Union Territories
b.    India comprises of 28 states and 5 Union Territories
c.    India comprises of 28 states and 7 Union Territories
d.    Indian comprises of 28 states and 8 Union Territories

11. The contribution of agriculture to the GDP of India is roughly:
a.    30%
b.    33%
c.    40%
d.    45%

12. The population of India according to the Census of 2001 is:

a.    9,038 Million
b.    1,028 Million
c.    1,052 Million
d.    1.074 Million

Answers

1. A & B
2. B
3. B
4. A
5. B
6. A
7. C
8. A
9. C
10. C
11. B
12. B



 

2014 Asian Games


Incheon
 was awarded the right on April 17, 2007, defeating Delhi, India to host the Games. Incheon is the third city in South Korea afterSeoul (1986) and Busan (2002) to host the Asian Games.The 2014 Asian Games, officially known as theXVII Asiad, is the largest sporting event in Asiagoverned by Olympic Council of Asia (OCA). It is scheduled to take place in Incheon, South Koreafrom September 19 – October 4, 2014 with 439 events in 36 sports and disciplines set to feature in the Games.

Organisation



A map of South Korea with Incheon marked in the north-west of the country.
Incheon
Magnify-clip.png
Location of Incheon in South Korea
2014 Asian Games bidding results
City
Country
Votes
32
13
Two cities were bidding for the Games, asDelhi (India) and Incheon (South Korea) made a formal bid on December 2, 2006 in Doha, Qatar.
The vote was held on April 17, 2007 at the Marriot Hotel in Kuwait City, Kuwait, during the OCA's general assembly. Final presentation prior to the votes, Incheon make a new offer, raising USD$20 million funds to support the countries who has yet won a medal in the Games, as well as offer free flight and accommodation to all the participants, while India offered nothing. All 45 members voted, with voting held in secret ballot. Around 4 p.m. local time, it was announced that Incheon won the rights, although the vote results were not released, it was revealed that Incheon won by 32–13.
It was widely felt that Delhi's lack of enthusiasm to host the event was the primary reason for its loss. Then Union Sports Minister of India, Mani Shankar Aiyar, spoke strongly against Delhi hosting the games and argued that it was better if the money allocated by India's government for organizing the sporting event was spent on building facilities for the poor. The Indian Olympic Association (IOA) president revealed that India's Sports Minister remarks against hosting the Games was the main reason for New Delhi's loss. The IOA delegation also added that the bids evaluation committee concerns about pollution and traffic in Delhi,]as well as Delhi offering US$200,000 to each team for games support against Incheon's offer of US$20 million to all 45 nations participating in the event could also have contributed to the defeat.

Slogan

Unveiled on September 16, 2010, "Diversity Shines Here" is the official slogan of the Games. It represents and highlights the significance of Asia’s wonderful diversity in history, cultures, and religions.

Marketing



The Spotted Seals, the Games' mascots. Named from left to right: Barame, Vichuon, and Chumuro.
Three Spotted seal siblings was unveiled on November 4, 2010 as official mascot of the Games in Songdo Island, Incheon. The three seals, known as "Barame", "Chumuro" and "Vichuon", means wind, dance and light in Korean language, is in accordance with the theme of main venue. The prototype was taken fromBaengnyeong Island. According to the organisers, the mascot was chosen as symbolic to the future peace between South Korea and North Korea. The official emblem also unveiled on same day, represent by a huge wing consisting of a string of "A", the first letter of "Asia", with a shining sun at its upper left, it symbolising the Asian people holding hands in the sky.[11]
Official poster of was released on March 31, 2011. The six posters, was designed after categorising the 28 Olympic sports into five groups to represent the philosophy and values of the Games. The five groups are racquet sports, ball sports, water sports, athletic sports andweight class. On September 27, 2012, Swiss watchmaker company Tissot was named as the official timekeeper of the Games. The official album was released by Universal Music was released on June 20, 2014, which featured "Only One", performed by JYJ as the official theme song of the Games.

Medals

The medals design was approved by OCA on August 19, 2013. It features the pentagon-shaped symbol representing the five ports of Incheon — Airport, Seaport, Teleport, Leisureport and Businessport, with emblem of Games inside. It symbolises the city as the hub of Northeast Asia.[17]

Costs

The cost of the Games was estimated at approximately US$1.62 billion, with the Korean government and Incheon government covering 19% and 78.9% respectively. Of the totalbudget, some US$1.39 billion will be used for the construction of venue and infrastructure, while approximately US$11 million will cover the building and maintenance of training grounds. Around US$103 million will be used for road and transportation projects.
However, report in April 2012 suggests the city is under pressure on its financial due to uprising debt.[19]
The IAGOC is expected to save US$34 million after agreeing to reduce from 15,000 to 2,025 athletes to be provided free of charge for transportation and accommodation.

Venues

There are 49 competition venues and 48 training facilities that will be used during the Games. Among the 49 competition venues, ten venues featured in six cities of Gyeonggi Province while another two featured in Chungju and Seoul. The rest of the venues featured in eight district and a county inside the metropolitan city of Incheon. Ten venues were constructed for the Games.[21] The Games also consist athletes and media villages that provide over 3,300 units and 9,560 rooms for athletes and media persons.
The main stadium, known as Incheon Asiad Main Stadium, has an all-seater capacity of 61,074 seats, with 30,000 seats are variable after the Games. The US$400 million stadium, who originally planned for 70,000 seats was designed by Populous, who has also designed several event venues around the world, including the Olympic Stadium of the2012 Summer Olympics. The groundbreaking ceremony was held on June 28, 2011 inYeonhui-dong, with construction beginning in June 2011 and expected to finish in April 2014.

Transport

Incheon Subway's construction period was shortened rather than planned 2018 completion.[19] Due to the increasing popularity of Incheon International Airport during the Games, the immigration procedures were improved to convenience the passengers.

Torch relay

The torch was revealed in October 2013, with the design motif is based on the official bird of Incheon Metropolitan City, the Crane, with the blue internal cylinder of torch signifying the sky and the ocean of Incheon. Another four colors (green, yellow, red, violet) were designed to represent the five regions of Asia
The torch was lit at Dhyan Chand National Stadium in New Delhi, India on August 9, 2014. This marked the first time the torch was lit outside the host country. For the first time also, the Games hosted by South Korea's city to have international torch relay as Weihai, a city inShandong province, was only the another city hosted the torch relay on August 12, 2014.
The domestic lighting ceremony was held at Manisan on Ganghwa Island on August 12, 2014. The domestic relay begin from August 13, 2014 and travel through 70 cities for 5,700 km until the opening ceremony.

Participating nations

Below is a list of all the participating NOCs; the number of competitors per delegation is indicated in brackets.
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Flag_of_Afghanistan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Afghanistan.svg.png Afghanistan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2c/Flag_of_Bahrain.svg/22px-Flag_of_Bahrain.svg.png Bahrain
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f9/Flag_of_Bangladesh.svg/22px-Flag_of_Bangladesh.svg.png Bangladesh
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/91/Flag_of_Bhutan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Bhutan.svg.png Bhutan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/Flag_of_Brunei.svg/22px-Flag_of_Brunei.svg.png Brunei
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/Flag_of_Cambodia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Cambodia.svg.png Cambodia
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Flag_of_the_People%27s_Republic_of_China.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_People%27s_Republic_of_China.svg.png China
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/51/Flag_of_North_Korea.svg/22px-Flag_of_North_Korea.svg.png North Korea (150)[32]
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/Flag_of_Hong_Kong.svg/22px-Flag_of_Hong_Kong.svg.png Hong Kong
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/41/Flag_of_India.svg/22px-Flag_of_India.svg.png India
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9f/Flag_of_Indonesia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Indonesia.svg.png Indonesia
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/Flag_of_Iran.svg/22px-Flag_of_Iran.svg.png Iran
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f6/Flag_of_Iraq.svg/22px-Flag_of_Iraq.svg.png Iraq
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/9e/Flag_of_Japan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Japan.svg.png Japan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Flag_of_Jordan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Jordan.svg.png Jordan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d3/Flag_of_Kazakhstan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Kazakhstan.svg.png Kazakhstan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/09/Flag_of_South_Korea.svg/22px-Flag_of_South_Korea.svg.png South Korea
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Flag_of_Kuwait.svg/22px-Flag_of_Kuwait.svg.png Kuwait
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c7/Flag_of_Kyrgyzstan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Kyrgyzstan.svg.png Kyrgyzstan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/56/Flag_of_Laos.svg/22px-Flag_of_Laos.svg.png Laos
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/59/Flag_of_Lebanon.svg/22px-Flag_of_Lebanon.svg.png Lebanon
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Flag_of_Macau.svg/22px-Flag_of_Macau.svg.png Macau
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/66/Flag_of_Malaysia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Malaysia.svg.png Malaysia
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0f/Flag_of_Maldives.svg/22px-Flag_of_Maldives.svg.png Maldives
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Flag_of_Mongolia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Mongolia.svg.png Mongolia
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8c/Flag_of_Myanmar.svg/22px-Flag_of_Myanmar.svg.png Myanmar
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9b/Flag_of_Nepal.svg/16px-Flag_of_Nepal.svg.png Nepal
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/dd/Flag_of_Oman.svg/22px-Flag_of_Oman.svg.png Oman
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Flag_of_Pakistan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Pakistan.svg.png Pakistan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/00/Flag_of_Palestine.svg/22px-Flag_of_Palestine.svg.png Palestine
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/99/Flag_of_the_Philippines.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_Philippines.svg.png Philippines
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Flag_of_Qatar.svg/22px-Flag_of_Qatar.svg.png Qatar
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Flag_of_Saudi_Arabia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Saudi_Arabia.svg.png Saudi Arabia
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/48/Flag_of_Singapore.svg/22px-Flag_of_Singapore.svg.png Singapore (227)
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/Flag_of_Sri_Lanka.svg/22px-Flag_of_Sri_Lanka.svg.png Sri Lanka
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/53/Flag_of_Syria.svg/22px-Flag_of_Syria.svg.png Syria
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/14/Flag_of_Chinese_Taipei_for_Olympic_games.svg/22px-Flag_of_Chinese_Taipei_for_Olympic_games.svg.png Chinese Taipei
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d0/Flag_of_Tajikistan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Tajikistan.svg.png Tajikistan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a9/Flag_of_Thailand.svg/22px-Flag_of_Thailand.svg.png Thailand
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/26/Flag_of_East_Timor.svg/22px-Flag_of_East_Timor.svg.png Timor-Leste
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Flag_of_Turkmenistan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Turkmenistan.svg.png Turkmenistan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cb/Flag_of_the_United_Arab_Emirates.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_Arab_Emirates.svg.png United Arab Emirates
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Flag_of_Uzbekistan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Uzbekistan.svg.png Uzbekistan
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/Flag_of_Vietnam.svg/22px-Flag_of_Vietnam.svg.png Vietnam
·         http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Flag_of_Yemen.svg/22px-Flag_of_Yemen.svg.png Yemen

Calendar

In the following calendar for the 2014 Asian Games, each blue box represents an event competition, such as a qualification round, on that day. The yellow boxes represent days during which medal-awarding finals for a sport were held, which numeric representing the number of finals that were contested on that day. On the left the calendar lists each sport with events held during the Games, and at the right how many gold medals were won in that sport. There is a key at the top of the calendar to aid the reader.
 OC 
Opening ceremony
   ●
Event competitions
 1 
Event finals
 CC 
Closing ceremony

September/October 2014
14th
Sun
15th
Mon
16th
Tue
17th
Wed
18th
Thu
19th
Fri
20th
Sat
21st
Sun
22nd
Mon
23rd
Tue
24th
Wed
25th
Thu
26th
Fri
27th
Sat
28th
Sun
29th
Mon
30th
Tue
1st
Wed
2nd
Thu
3rd
Fri
4th
Sat
Gold
medals
2
2
2
2
2
10
6
6
7
7
6
6
38
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
4
4
8
5
8
7
4
11
11
1
47
1
1
1
2
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
12
3
10
13
2
2
4
6
6
12
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
3
10
1
1
2
1
1
6
2
2
2
2
2
2
12
1
1
2
Golf pictogram.svg Golf
4
4
1
1
2
5
5
14
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
Judo pictogram.svg Judo
4
5
5
2
16
2
2
5
5
3
13
2
2
4
7
7
14
2
2
14
14
2
2
2
6
4
4
4
4
4
10
6
6
2
44
2
2
4
2
3
2
7
4
4
4
4
16
2
3
2
7
2
1
2
2
7
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
15
4
4
4
4
4
20
2
2
2
2
7
15
Blank.png Ceremonies
OC
CC
Total gold medals
18
24
27
29
38
38
22
24
30
26
35
46
39
36
7
439
Cumulative Total
18
42
69
98
136
174
196
220
250
276
311
357
396
432
439
September/October 2014
14th
Sun
15th
Mon
16th
Tue
17th
Wed
18th
Thu
19th
Fri
20th
Sat
21st
Sun
22nd
Mon
23rd
Tue
24th
Wed
25th
Thu
26th
Fri
27th
Sat
28th
Sun
29th
Mon
30th
Tue
1st
Wed
2nd
Thu
3rd
Fri
4th
Sat
Gold
medals

Games

Opening ceremony

The opening ceremony will be held from 19:00 to 22:00 local time on September 19, 2014. The performance will combine the elements Korean traditional culture and modern technology.

Sports

The 2014 Games is scheduled to feature the 28 Olympic sports which will be contested at the 2016 Summer Olympics. In addition, eight non-Olympic sports will be featured: baseball, ten-pin bowling, cricket, kabaddi, karate, sepak takraw, squash and wushu. The list was finalised on December 9, 2010 at the OCA's executive board meeting in Muscat, Oman. This resulted in six other sports: roller sport, chess, cue sports, softball, dancesport and dragon boat, which were held in previous Games being dropped from the list. The list was approved on July 13, 2011 during the 30th annual general assembly in Tokyo as softballincorporated with baseball as one sport while soft tennis is under the discipline of tennis. For the first time, compound archery, mixed relay triathlon, judo team events were introduced.
The changes in the non-Olympic sports featured at the Asian Games were influenced by discussions with organizers, who had suggested the removal of cricket from the program because they felt too few countries played it, and because they lacked infrastructure to host it. However, the OCA disputed the proposed removal of cricket, citing its popularity and viewer interest.



DAV MOVEMENT

Background

The Indian society was at its cultural, social and political nadir when Maharishi Dayanand Saraswati was born in 1824. He grew up in an environment of political subjugation, where he witnessed extreme casteism, superstition,religious dogma and social oppression of women and marginalized sections of society. 

He openly stood up against all the social evils such as discrimination on grounds of caste, creed, sex, economic status and social bigotry, male chauvinism and religious dominance of higher castes over the backward castes andclasses. He fought for the rights of women and opened " Kanya Vidyalayas" to empower and enlighten them. Unfortunately, the task of social resurgence was too vast to be completed during his lifetime and when Maharishi attained Samadhi in 1883, the Indian society was only partially reformed, with the onus of completing this unfinished task falling on his followers.

Taking a STOCKhttp://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png of the ground realities of Indian society and the nature of the task undertaken by Maharishi, his followers decided to commemorate his life and works not by building lifeless statues, but by opening temples of learning - schools and colleges where all the values advocated by Maharishi would be inculcated in the children so that they could carry forward his message and work ceaselessly throughout their life to carry out the reforms suggested by him. 

In 1885 the first DAV School was established at Lahore which was subsequently upgraded to become the first DAVCollege. In 1886 the DAV College Trust and Management Society was established and registered. The DAV Society visualized that the DAV Schools shall produce men and women of sterling national character and social commitment. The commendable objectives of the DAV attracted several committed individuals and groups to serve the society by striving to collect petty donations and gather humble resources to set up DAV Schools to spread Maharishi's message for enlightening all the Indians. Thus the crusade against ignorance, illiteracy, injustice and inequality was revived and it gained further momentum with the opening of each DAV School. 

DAV College Managing Committee, the executive body of the DAV College Trust & Management Society,streamlined the school curriculum and administrative processes and gave the social movement a splendid vision and precise direction. Towards the end of nineteenth century and in the first half of twentieth century the DAV College Trust & Management Society established a number of schools. These schools were broadly categorized as directly controlled and managed schools. Some more schools came into the DAV fold as they were subsequently affiliated to DAV College Trust & Management Society. 

The DAV institutions soon gained respect and reputation in the society and began to be recognized for their highacademic standards and value-based education. The faculty comprised towering personalities such as Mahatma Hansraj, Principal Gyan Chand, Lala Sain Das and Pandit Meher Chand, who selflessly dedicated their lives to the reengineering of the Indian society through modern education and Vedic values. A glorious DAV alumni is a testimony to these facts. 

Thus started the movement, which right from the beginning was led by missionaries, visionaries, nationalistic and other like-minded people. As the times rolled on, there emerged new needs, new challenges and new decisions in tandem with the changing scenario. The DAV Movement continued to surge ahead under the dynamic and motivating leadership of Sh. Mehr Chand, Lala Balraj, Justice Mehar Chand Mahajan, Dr.G.L.Dutta, Lala Suraj Bhan, Prof Ved Vyas, Sh. Darbari Lal , Sh. T.R. Tuli, Sh G P Chopra and Shri Punam Suri. It was their missionary consciousness that fostered the growth of many more institutions across the country and lead DAV to newer heights.
TheLegacy 

The vision of a powerful and enlightened India had been conceived by Maharishi Dayanand Saraswati (1824-1883). He devoted his whole life to awaken the ignorant, illiterate masses of this country. He knew that it could be possible only through education and literacy. The vision and philosophy of the fearless reformer, Maharshi Dayanand, was given a practical shape by Mahatma Hans Raj, who led the educational renaissance in India. 

As his most important legacy, the Mahatma left behind a pragmatic and enlightened approach to education. One aspect of his approach was his choice of English- oriented Science-based education with a blend of Vedic values. Another was the great emphasis he laid on women education. Lastly, true to the egalitarian basis of Arya Samaj philosophy (as conceived by Maharishi Dayanand), Mahatmaji believed in equality for all students irrespective of their caste, colour or creed were welcome to join the DAV institution. The first institution was established at Lahore in 1886 with Lala Hans Raj (Later Mahatma Hansraj) himself as the dedicated Headmaster. Today, the movement is led by DAV veterans like Shri Punam Suri and his team of dedicated Office Bearers, who have a progressive vision. It is due to their dedication and farsightedners that every year DAV CMC is opening new schools in various parts of India.
The Mission 

The DAV vision of education telescopes well with the National Policy on Education (1986) which lays great emphasis on developing a national system of education, with Education For All, keeping in mind the elimination of disparities in the educational system and provision of more facilities through qualitative interventions, empowerment of women, access to education to disadvantaged sections of the society, educationally backward minorities and the disabled. It also calls for greater rigour and discipline in academic pursuits, autonomy and accountability, experimentation and innovation and nurture excellence and modernization of processes at different levels of education. In order to accomplish the mission, the objectives laid down are as under:
  • To provide a wide range of holistic education by homogenizing the western knowledge while remaining anchored to the Indian cultural moorings;
  • To act as a catalyst of change by spreading education, and by dismantling the cobwebs of ignorance and illiteracy;
  • To develop individuals who are morally upright, intellectually well-informed, socially concerned, emotionally balanced, physically well-developed and culturally accomplished;
  • To stimulate a scientific temper by crusading against superstitions and out-dated customs like child marriage, caste system, female foeticide, dowry, gender bias, regionalism etc;
  • To sensitize individuals towards social welfare and
  • To nurture creative and resourceful minds who think big, think fast and think ahead, who care for the nation and the weaker sections of society, and are imbued with humanistic passions and values.
The Vision 

The DAV has a clear-cut vision:
  • To continue expanding and exploring, locally and globally and be a knowledge leader and content provider.
  • To muster strategies to become a global epicenter of knowledge, culture, skills, technology, research and service.
  • To empower women through education.

Swami Dayanand

Saraswati Ji

In the middle of the 19th century, Maharishi Dayanand Saraswati felt a strong need to revitalise India intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. 'Back to Vedas' was his redeeming call. Maharishi Dayanand thus started a spiritual and social renaissance in society. After 3 years of the death of the Maharishi, i.e. 1886, Dayanand Anglo Vedic (DAV) Trust and Management Society came into existence, to realise the prophetic vision of this great thinker philosopher . It was registered under the Societies Act of 1860, and the same year the first DAV School was established at Lahore with Lala Hansraj { later on known as Mahatma Hansraj } as the Honorary Headmaster. 



v:shapes="_x0000_s1026"> Mahatma Hansraj (1864 - 1938)

Mahtama Hansraj, born on the 19th April 1864, was a mahatma (a great soul), indeed. The two great mahatmas, Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) and Mahatma Hansraj (1864-1938) traced identical paths, one in the political field and the other in the socio-cultural, almost contemporaneously. Frail of body but possesing heroic spirit, both of them voluntarily opted for a life of self denial and renuncation though both of them could command the most alluring luxuries for the mere asking. They were both Karamyogis and following the gospel of Gita they sought fulfillment of action, not in fruit.

Mahatma Hansraj was the founder Head Master of DAV School.
Om (written universally as ; in Devanagari as ओं oṃ[õː], औं auṃ [ə̃ũ], or ओ३म् om [õːm]) is a mantra and mystical Sanskrit sound of Hindu origin (geographically India and Nepal), sacred and important in various Dharmic religions such asHinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. The syllable is also referred to as omkara (ओंकार oṃkāra) or aumkara(औंकार auṃkāra), literally "om syllable", and inSanskrit it is sometimes referred to as praṇava, literally "that which is sounded out loudly".
Om or Aum is also written ओ३म् (o̿m [õːːm]), where ispluta ("three times as long"), indicating a length of three morae (that is, the time it takes to say three syllables)—an overlong nasalised close-mid back rounded vowel—though there are other enunciations adhered to in received traditions. It is placed at the beginning of mostHindu texts as a sacred incantation to be intoned at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or prior to any prayer or mantra. It is used at the end of the invocation to the god being sacrificed to (anuvakya) as an invitation to and for the latter to partake o

WTO NEWS: 
11 August 2014
Azevêdo: Support of private sector is crucial for future of multilateral trading system
Director-General Roberto Azevêdo, in his speech at the opening session of Entrepreneur Week in Mexico City on 11 August 2014, said: “By locking-in countries’ obligations on trade practices, the WTO safeguards important business interests and increases the stability businesses need to flourish.” He thanked Mexico for being a strong supporter of the WTO and urged small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and entrepreneurs to support Mexico’s engagement in the multilateral trading system. This is what he said:








  
Introduction
  • Mr Ildefonso Guajardo, Secretary of the Economy;
  • Mr Enrique Jacob Rocha, President of the National Entrepreneurs' Institute;
  • Ambassador Fernando de Mateo, representative of Mexico in Geneva;
  • Ambassador Marcos Raposo Lopes, Brazil's Ambassador to Mexico, a friend for the last 30 years;
  • Ladies and gentlemen,
  • It is a great pleasure to be here today. I thank you for your kind invitation. 
I am pleased to have the opportunity to meet with the private sector during my first visit to Mexico as Director-General of the World Trade Organization.
My meetings with government representatives, including President Peña Nieto, have been very positive and fruitful.
Mexico was a founding member of the WTO — and remains a very important player in our work. At the same time, I think the WTO plays an important role in supporting Mexico's trade — and therefore in supporting Mexican companies.
Indeed, the multilateral trading system does a great deal to help businesses — and SMEs in particular — in ways that aren't immediately apparent and of which I think many people aren't aware.
So this is the topic of my speech today — I want to tackle the question: “what can the WTO do for SMEs?”

WHAT IS THE WTO?
But first it might be useful to answer a more fundamental question: what is the WTO?
In simple terms the WTO provides the rules of the global trading system and it does so on the basis of an agreement between its members.
We have 160 members, who together account for around 97% of the global economy. Every one of those 160 countries or territories has signed up to observe a set of rules which now govern global trade on a very wide range of topics — from tariffs and subsidies to patents and technical barriers to trade.
To back up these rules, the WTO also monitors adherence to these rules and provides a forum to resolve any trade disputes which may arise.
Our purpose is to boost trade as a means to an end. This end is  to support growth and development — and therefore to improve people's lives.
But let me be more specific…

WHAT THE WTO DOES FOR SMEs
Over the years, WTO rules have helped to improve the business environment worldwide.
First, by providing predictability.
By locking-in countries' obligations on trade practices, the WTO safeguards important business interests and increases the stability businesses need to flourish.
SMEs know the importance of stability more than anyone — and the risks caused by the lack of it. Small companies may not have a second chance to adapt to unpredictable rules.
Second, the WTO helps improve transparency of trade-related measures.
WTO rules help businesses across the globe to better understand practices and policies from different countries.
This also helps WTO members to scrutinize policies and, if necessary, to raise concerns about their trading partners.
Through WTO Inquiry Points, for example, any company can ask about the technical barriers to trade that are being imposed by a WTO member. And of course it's free of charge.
But now let's focus specifically on how the WTO can help to create new business opportunities for SMEs.
By lowering barriers to trade, the WTO provides access to new markets and keeps protectionism at bay.
To use the most obvious example, every WTO member has limits to the import tariffs they can adopt, and this is because of WTO rules.
The same is true for non-tariff barriers to trade. If it were not for the WTO, there would be no clear safeguards to prevent protectionist measures being disguised as technical barriers to trade.
Compared with large firms, SMEs are especially dependent on trade-liberalizing initiatives to break into foreign markets. For example, unlike big companies, SMEs do not possess offshore business affiliates that can be used to circumvent trade or investment barriers.
The WTO also helps reduce the costs of cross-border trade by streamlining and standardizing customs procedures.
Bureaucracy is a problem that SMEs know too well.
The WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement was a major step in tackling bureaucracy to trade. Estimates shows that 10 to 15% of costs can be eliminated with the implementation of this land-mark agreement that was concluded last December in Bali.
Implementation of the Agreement would go a long way to help SMEs to penetrate more foreign markets.
However, at this point in time, WTO members are considering how — or whether — to bring this Agreement into force. Unfortunately the first major deadline for the implementation of the Agreement was missed at the end of July. Members are now considering what the way forward might be.  I'll come back to this later.
Next, WTO rules increase opportunities for companies to join global value chains.
Tackling barriers to trade in goods and in services, reducing transaction costs, improving the business environment: these are key elements for SMEs in Mexico or anywhere in the world to be able to join global value chains.
These value chains offer an opportunity to integrate in the world economy at lower costs, by specialising in producing just some components or tasks instead of complete products.
Of course, there are risks, but there is no doubt that there are real opportunities here.
The WTO can also support SMEs through our work in resolving trade disputes.
Very often these disputes involve big companies but that's not always the case.
A variety of disputes in the WTO involve interests of SMEs in different parts of the world. For example, the high number of cases involving sectors such as textiles and footwear shows that, even without knowing, important market access opportunities for SMEs in these sectors are being secured through WTO disputes.
More fundamentally though, as countries have to  abide by shared rules, companies all over the world have better chances to compete in a fair way, according to their ability, rather than any other consideration.
And we know that trade is an important driver for business.
Evidence shows that SMEs that trade and are involved in the international economy tend to be more innovative, create more jobs, pay better wages and have better revenue growth.
So even if SMEs are not engaged with the work of the WTO — nevertheless, the WTO is working for them. It helps to shape the environment they operate in.
And even if SMEs are not directly engaged in foreign trade, our work will affect the competition you face in your market, or the products and services you need for your business.
So it's important for SMEs that we carry out our work successfully.
And I think we can do a lot more.

WHAT WE CAN DO FOR SMEs in FUTURE
Let me expand on some of the things I believe the WTO can do for SMEs in the future.
To begin with, we can improve what we do.
For example:
  • We can help to increase transparency of trade measures, such as non-tariff barriers. 
  • We can work to improve the monitoring of countries' rules and practices.
  • And we can further help to keep protectionism at bay.
Perhaps the biggest difference we could make, however, would be through advancing negotiations to update WTO rules, in the context of the Doha Round.
This is where the big gains are.
The issues on the table include:
  • further reductions in tariffs and to prevent them from increasing;
  • tackling trade-distortive subsidies in the agriculture sector;
  • and increasing predictability and  market access opportunities for all service sectors.
At the WTO conference in Bali last December, ministers tasked members to develop a well-defined work programme by the end of this year to set out how we would complete this work.
However, the setback that I mentioned earlier on the implementation of the Trade Facilitation Agreement may affect this work.
My sense, in the light of the things I was hearing from members, is that this is not just another delay which can simply be ignored or accommodated into a new timetable.
But of course it is not me who will decide what the consequences will be. How we move forward is in the hands of members.
For this reason, I asked them to use the summer break to think carefully about what the next steps might be — and to reflect long and hard on the ramifications of this setback.
The support of the Mexican government and the Mexican business community is essential here. Mexico can play an important role presenting constructive and reasonable ways forward.

THE EVOLVING TRADE LANDSCAPE
And we have to be conscious that the trade landscape is evolving.
Clearly for some countries a lot of focus is currently on regional trade agreements.
Mexico itself has already built a considerably dense web of trade agreements. NAFTA, to begin with, is 20 years old and came into existence around the same time the WTO itself was being created.
So, as you know all too well, regional trade agreements are not something new and they can complement the multilateral trading system.
A good example of this is the continuous use of the dispute settlement system in the WTO by countries that are also part of regional trade agreements. A couple of years ago, when disputes raised at the WTO amounted to 443, a total of 82 of those involved members of a regional agreement. It is noteworthy that NAFTA members participated in over 20 of these disputes at the WTO.
Nowadays, what we see is a new set of trade initiatives covering different groupings and different topics. I am sure that you have heard of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, or ongoing talks on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership between the US and the EU, or the talks on the Trade in Services Agreement.
Of course, Mexico is involved in some of these initiatives.
But, as in the past, I do not believe they are at the expense of our work at the multilateral level. These initiatives clearly have a role to play — indeed, I believe that they are an important complement to multilateral efforts.
As a matter of fact, one very important undertaking with a group of countries is being conducted in the WTO itself — the expansion of the Information Technology Agreement. This is a crucial agreement for trade and economic development. The initiative on environmental goods is another negotiation that may result in commercial liberalization in a non-discriminatory way. And in this case, with especially positive effects for sustainable development.
But it is clear that these initiatives are not sufficient on their own.
For example, they leave out a large number of countries — not only the most dynamic emerging economies, but also the smallest and most vulnerable.
In addition, many of the big issues can only be efficiently tackled at the global level — and therefore many of the big gains can only be delivered at this level too. These issues include:
  • streamlining customs procedures;
  • tackling agricultural subsidies; or  
  • dealing with regulations on critical areas such as telecommunications or financial services.
Therefore the different tracks have to exist together — they are symbiotic.
We cannot ignore the importance of  updating the multilateral trading system, so that we can better respond to the needs of businesses worldwide — including SMEs.
NEW DELHI: India will keep a pledge to ratify a trillion-dollar global pact on easing trade restrictions, a minister told local media Saturday, adding negotiations with fellowWorld Trade Organisation members had not hit a "dead end".

Commerce Minister Nirmala Sitharaman's remarks to a news channel marked a softer public tone to India's stance on the 
Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) -- a universal customs clearance deal which would mark the first big global trade liberalisation deal in two decades.

She said she wanted to stress the 
WTOnegotiation process "certainly has not hit a dead end", after New Delhi refused to ratify the accord in down-to-the-wire negotiations last month at the organisation's Geneva headquarters.

India is seeking to wrest concessions from developed nations on allowing food subsidies for its poor.

"We are agreeing to everything done in Bali, we are not saying we are going to dishonour that commitment, we will honour that commitment," Sitharaman said.

All 160 WTO members, including India, agreed to the accord at the December 2013 meeting on the Indonesian holiday island.

But at the same time she reiterated India must have the right to ensure food security for its hundreds of millions of poor farmers and consumers through grain subsidies that developed nations regard as distorting trade.

The minister's remarks came after visiting US Secretary of State John Kerry told new Prime Minister Narendra Modi earlier this month that New Delhi's stance on the pact sent the wrong message about his pro-business government's desire to liberalise India's economy, which remains state dominated.

Modi told Kerry that developed nations must "understand the challenges of poverty" in developing nations.

Experts believe the trade facilitation pact could boost global commerce by $1 trillion by modernising and streamlining trade rules to allow goods to pass more easily through customs.

According to the Bali-agreed timetable, the 
TFA was due to go into effect in mid-2015 after what WTO officials had expected to be its rubber-stamp ratification last month.

At the time of the Bali accord, the trade body's members agreed on a four-year "peace clause" to protect India from WTO action over subsidies and stockpiles until a "permanent" solution" was reached.

But after the Bali pact, Indian officials complained there were nearly two dozen meetings on the trade pact and just a handful on farm subsidies.

The commerce minister called India's last-minute refusal to ratify the pact "a little course correction (that was) desperately needed".

WTO diplomats are on a month-long summer break but Indian officials would "engage" with the organisation after their return, she said.

BRICS SUMMIT 2014
Brazil hosted, on the 14th, 15th, and 16th July 2014, the 6th Summit of Heads of State and ofGovernment of BRICS, held in Fortaleza and Brasília. The Summit adopted the Fortaleza Declaration and Action Plan, the Agreement on the New Development Bank, the Treaty for the Establishment of a BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement and agreements among BRICS Development Banks and Export Credit Insurance Agencies (available here)

At its 6th Summit, the BRICS emphasized social inclusion and sustainable development. The debate was be informed by the theme "Inclusive growth: sustainable solutions". The Summit inaugurated the second cycle of BRICS. Each member country has hosted one meeting of Leaders.

The Fortaleza Summit showcased BRICS accomplishments and the discussions leading to the realization of its vast potential. Since its first Summit, in 2009, BRICS has consolidated its position as a positive force for the democratization of international relations and for the enhancement of existing institutions of international governance. It has also forged an impressive partnership carrying out cooperation initiatives in more than 30 areas between its members.

Among other topics, the Leaders discussed the Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) and the New Development Bank (NBD). The CRA is an additional line of defense available to the BRICS countries in scenarios of  Balance of Payments' difficulties. The NBD will finance infrastructure and sustainable development projects.

In Brasília, on the 16th, a working session was held between the Leaders of BRICS and the Heads of State and/or Government of South America. The dialogue between  BRICS  Leaders and their  South American counterparts reflects  the priority accorded to developing countries in the BRICS outreach strategy.
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif

On the 14th, in Fortaleza, as part of the BRICS Summit, the following meetings were held: Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors meeting, Trade Ministers meeting, Development Bank Presidents meeting, Business Forum and a session of the Business Council of the BRICS.

The Academic Forum of the BRICS was held in Rio de Janeiro, on the 18th and 19th March 2014; the meeting of the Think Tanks Council was also held in Rio de Janeiro, on the 17th March 2014


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